Here we go again. The age old debate of whether tipping your waiter or waitress is a requirement or an option. It can certainly be a spirited debate. Those who have never worked in that industry think it's dumb that on top of paying for their meal, they have to pay their server, too. Those who have worked in the industry understand how much they depend on being tipped to take care of everyday necessities. All Things Longview on Facebook has gotten pretty heated over the last week talking about it.

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Tipping is based on quality of service, not a requirement.

It all seemed to start with a post that said "Tipping is based on quality of service, not a requirement" and oh boy did the fight start. Frankly, the guy (we'll just use his first name, Cory) is one of those who must think that waiters and waitresses are people that are beneath him. That's a horrible attitude to take with your fellow man or woman. Cory, you have not made yourself a better person by thinking you are the best person.

But I digress.

There are many who believe that the practice of paying a waiter or waitress $2.15 an hour, or whatever the rate is nowadays, and supplementing the rest of their pay based on tips should go away. In a way, I agree. I have many friends who have worked or still work in the service industry. Tips are essential for them to pay their rent, buy groceries and whatever else to provide for their family.

If you are going to a non-fast food restaurant, you need to tip your waiter or waitress. That $2.15 an hour check they get every two weeks is just there to cover their taxes. I've personally seen those checks come out to $3 or $4 or some being as little as just a few cents. Getting tipped is where they make their income.

They provide a service so their tip should be based on the service given.

However, there is a minimum to this. That would be 15% of your bill's total. For a $100 bill, that's $15. If you have this pedestal of service that you are expecting at 7 p.m. on a Saturday night in a packed dining room with your group of six friends and your server doesn't meet that too tall pedestal, then just leave your 15% and be done with it. If your server goes above and beyond, which so many do, you're just choose to ignore it, than added a few extra bucks to the bill.

I'm starting to get a little salty here but I make no apologies for it.

How you treat your waiter or waitress goes a long into showing what kind of person you are. If you can't treat them with some respect, then you are the problem, not their service.

We're all stressed out right now. We're all tired of hearing nothing but doom and gloom. We're all tired of being taken advantage of. Taking out that frustration on a complete stranger who is just trying to help you have a good meal is not how to handle it. It's not.

So Where Do We Go From Here

Some of you are probably pretty mad at me right now. I get it. You have a strong opinion about a the debate of tipping. Well, so do I. Tipping is essential for those that are serving you. If you believe they have done a bad job, then leave the minimum 15% and be done with it. If you feel they have done an exceptional job, then leave them some extra. That's how tipping should work.

But for you to go into a restaurant with the mindset of "I don't believe in tipping" or "Their job is menial" or "They just need to get another job" then your mindset needs to change.

Stop being a Ken and Karen and just order a pizza. Just go pick it up yourself since you don't want to tip the delivery driver.

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