Some trees around East Texas are still struggling to come back after being in the deep freeze in February, but there's reason to be hopeful that they'll make a full recovery.

It's been two months since the winter storm, and some trees around East Texas are still trying to figure out if they can push out all of their buds and leaves or not.  Some bushes and shrubs turned brown and crispy after the freezing temperatures in February and never bloomed, and those are probably goners.  It's sad, right?  Some of Texas' big, majestic trees are gone.  I've heard that the Texas Hill Country lost some 400-year-old trees that helped make areas around Kerrville and Fredericksburg stand out, and contributed to those gorgeous Hill Country views.

Oak trees are usually very hardy, and even though some haven't rebounded yet I'm seeing that there is still hope.

Master Gardener, Neil Sperry, has written several books about gardening, and he lives in McKinney, TX.  He said on his Facebook page that the best advice is to wait and see.  Patience is key!  The Texas A&M Forest Service agreed that there is no fixed date as to when you might know if your tree is going to survive or not, but if your tree hasn’t produced a single leaf by July, it is most likely dead. For trees that are leafing out but look scraggly or patchy in their canopy coverage, there may be hope and you should wait until next spring to make a final decision on those trees. Any buds are better than no buds at all.

I've already ripped out three big shrubs from my front yard, diced them up, and put them into big brown lawn bags to be hauled away, so it's probably too late to "wait and see" on those.  BUT, if you have patience longer than that of a gnat, you might discover that your trees and shrubs will come to life eventually, and your yard will be back in business before you know it.

The trees had to be shocked by February's weather, not knowing if they were still in Texas or had somehow accidentally teleported to Michigan's Upper Penninsula for the winter.  It's Texas, trees.  Hang in there.

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