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With 20 days left in the 87th Texas Legislative Session and deadlines fast approaching, you will start to hear more about pieces of legislation that are dead. We will highlight some of those here at KFYO.com.

One bill that is dead? The so-called TEXIT legislation by Rep. Kyle Biedermann. Biedermann said his bill didn't even get a hearing in committee. According to the Dallas Morning News, supporters of the legislation are urging Governor Greg Abbott to call a special session to take up the piece of legislation, but that is unlikely to happen. The legislation was a longshot to begin with and Governor Abbott doesn't strike me as the TEXIT type of Governor.

Bidermann of course argued that his bill just would have started a conversation according to a previous story on KFYO.com.

Rep. Biedermann said, “This Act simply Lets Texans Vote. This decision is too big to be monopolized solely by the power brokers in our Capitol. We need to let Texans’ voices be heard! Voters of all political persuasions in Texas can agree on one thing, Washington D.C. is and has been broken. Our federal government continuously fails our working families, seniors, taxpayers, veterans and small business owners. For decades, the promises of America and our individual liberties have been eroding. It is now time that the People of Texas are allowed the right to decide their own future. This is not a left or right political issue. Let Texans Vote!”

And while it may have started a conversation, it may have been short lived as many legal experts say that Texas can't secede.

While the legislation may be dead right now, that doesn't mean the sentiment is dead. It wouldn't surprise me at all to see another TEXIT bill in 2 years.

LOOK: Here are the 50 best beach towns in America

Every beach town has its share of pluses and minuses, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best one to live in. To find out, Stacker consulted data from WalletHub, released June 17, 2020, that compares U.S. beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The cities ranged in population from 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From those rankings, we selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will be unsurprised to learn that many of towns featured here are in one of those two states.

Keep reading to see if your favorite beach town made the cut.